Pulse-to-Pulse Phase Diversity Processing for Interference Suppression and Range Disambiguation

Organization: MIT Lincoln Laboratory
Year: 2017

Pulse-to-Pulse Phase Diversity Processing for Interference Suppression and Range Disambiguation is a powerful new mode of operation for pulse Doppler radar. This technique utilizes a specialized radar transmit waveform and a tailored chain of signal processing algorithms to adaptively suppress important classes of interference, while only requiring minimal additional hardware. Pulse-to-pulse phase diversity processing is a significant improvement over traditional “range-ambiguous” pulse Doppler radar operation modes that are widely used today. Although high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) pulse Doppler radar provides benefits, such as the ability to measure high velocity in an unambiguous manner, the highly range-ambiguous characteristic means that targets and interference typically alias or “fold” into the same radar range cell, even if they are disparate in physical range. Pulse Doppler radar returns are effectively wrapped into the ambiguous range span. The length of this span is inversely proportional to the PRF. Wind turbine interference, ground clutter and other interferers may coincide with the desired target in ambiguous range and impede the radar’s ability to detect a desired target or measure its radar cross section (RCS).

 

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